TEGELSLAGAREN 12 + FUNKISKÖK

Tegelslageren 12 is a unique renovation project and collaboration between the property owner JW Fastigheter, Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter and Mod:Group. We were asked to manufacture the kitchens in this exciting project based on drawings of the original kitchens from 1937. Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter studied the original kitchens and redesigned them to suit the needs of the present. Funkiskök contributed with its experience in building kitchens, materials and technical solutions.

Tegelslagaren 12 has served residents, visitors and traders well for over eighty years. The building's cultural-historical classification requires greater care be given to ensure a sound and appealing renovation where the whole house has been restored according to its original dimensions. The parts that can be recycled are saved and renovated. Thus, the best of the 1930s is combined with the best of the 2020s.

TEGELSLAGAREN 12

Tegelslagaren 12 is a culturally and historically valuable residential building on eastern Södermalm in Stockholm's inner city, built 1936-1937. The building was the architectural firm Backström & Reinius' first building and was erected by builder Olle Engkvist. The house has a well-preserved and distinctive façade in red brick with teak bay windows. Exterior details and ground floor facade completed in wood.

Tegelslagaren 12 is blue classified according to Stockholm City Museum's cultural history classification. This means "property with buildings of extremely high cultural-historical value".

A BUILDING FOR THE AGES

The layout of the apartments was already noted at the time in the book "Fyrtiotalets Svenska Bostad" where Nils Ahrbom wrote: "The well-studied plan...is in its geometric clarity one of the best examples of a mass housing plan—well-proportioned rooms, simple and solid construction." With modern comforts such as communal refrigerator system, utility rooms, mangle rooms and site-built drying cabinets, the building was as sober as it was elegant a response to contemporary needs.

A SÖDER CLASSIC

Crafted in red brick, with bay windows and teak panel ground floor and distinctive multi-air windows, Tegelslagaren 12 was an unusual house for its time, foreshadowing the 40s. The facades emphasize form and materials in contrast to the then prevailing functionalist ideals that produced smooth-plastered exteriors and long window boards. Clear historical markers for the time include a fully glazed commercial ground floor and round pillars as well as corner-placed windows.

The house remains made up of rental apartments and is dominated by smaller apartment sizes. Here there is a mooring to the area's need for housing, and the structure of society at large. The residential building has high environmental and living qualities in an attractive area of Södermalm.

Tegelslageren 12 is a unique renovation project and collaboration between the property owner JW Fastigheter, Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter and Mod:Group. We were asked to manufacture the kitchens in this exciting project based on drawings of the original kitchens from 1937. Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter studied the original kitchens and redesigned them to suit the needs of the present. Funkiskök contributed with its experience in building kitchens, materials and technical solutions.

Tegelslagaren 12 has served residents, visitors and traders well for over eighty years. The building's cultural-historical classification requires greater care be given to ensure a sound and appealing renovation where the whole house has been restored according to its original dimensions. The parts that can be recycled are saved and renovated. Thus, the best of the 1930s is combined with the best of the 2020s.

TEGELSLAGAREN 12

Tegelslagaren 12 is a culturally and historically valuable residential building on eastern Södermalm in Stockholm's inner city, built 1936-1937. The building was the architectural firm Backström & Reinius' first building and was erected by builder Olle Engkvist. The house has a well-preserved and distinctive façade in red brick with teak bay windows. Exterior details and ground floor facade completed in wood.

Tegelslagaren 12 is blue classified according to Stockholm City Museum's cultural history classification. This means "property with buildings of extremely high cultural-historical value".

A BUILDING FOR THE AGES

The layout of the apartments was already noted at the time in the book "Fyrtiotalets Svenska Bostad" where Nils Ahrbom wrote: "The well-studied plan...is in its geometric clarity one of the best examples of a mass housing plan—well-proportioned rooms, simple and solid construction." With modern comforts such as communal refrigerator system, utility rooms, mangle rooms and site-built drying cabinets, the building was as sober as it was elegant a response to contemporary needs.

A SÖDER CLASSIC

Crafted in red brick, with bay windows and teak panel ground floor and distinctive multi-air windows, Tegelslagaren 12 was an unusual house for its time, foreshadowing the 40s. The facades emphasize form and materials in contrast to the then prevailing functionalist ideals that produced smooth-plastered exteriors and long window boards. Clear historical markers for the time include a fully glazed commercial ground floor and round pillars as well as corner-placed windows.

The house remains made up of rental apartments and is dominated by smaller apartment sizes. Here there is a mooring to the area's need for housing, and the structure of society at large. The residential building has high environmental and living qualities in an attractive area of Södermalm.

KITCHENS

In the property there are two different kitchen setups. A smaller kitchen for one room apartments and a slightly larger kitchen plan accommodating larger layouts. Both layouts are parallel kitchens that were very common during Functionalism–often quite small kitchens but very well functioning and efficient. We have built new frames according to archiect drawings. These drawings are a direct interpretation of the original kitchens from 1937. Some Parts have then been adjusted to suit the needs of the present. Some parts from the original kitchens have been preserved, such as the solid teak countertops and knobs/pulls, the latter having been sanded and reused.

The original kitchen, with details such as fan hood, built-in refrigerator and teak worktop.

New kitchen taken from the same view. Fan hood and cabinets adhere to its original. The teak worktop from 1937 is sanded and oiled.

All frames and drawers are made of solid pine, the same material as was used in the original kitchens from 1937–the same material we use in all our kitchen manufacturing.

We have custom-built all the cabinets according to the architects' drawings. All cabinets are unique and built to the dimensions that existed in the original kitchens but now with a comfortable worktop height and self-closing slides in the drawers.

Frames and panels/drawer fronts are white. The sink and splashguard in stainless steel mimic the originals and is made by Decosteel. The handles and countertop in teak from 1939 has been carefully renovated and can now be reused for hopefully another 80 years.

Credits:
Antiquties research, Reichmann Arkitekter
2019-07-05 Stockholms Digital Museum, images from the end of the 1930s.
Interior images: ArkDes Arkiv.
Property images: Victor Johansson.
Kitchen images: Joakim Johansson

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